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Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Report Cards, 1991-1992

 Collection — Multiple Containers
Identifier: MS-2021-035

Content Description

This collection contains Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools report cards, which measures the nature and extent of student progress in each of the system's schools. Each report card contains three main sets of data: school description (describes the school-based staff), student participation (describes participation in and referral to attendance, enrollment, and other student-related goals), and student outcome (describes the readiness of student preparedness for the next grade level, as well as test results).

The report cards are arranged into four series:

Series 1: Elementary Schools, 1991-1992, contains report cards for 73 elementary schools.

Series 2, High Schools, 1991-1992, contains report cards for 10 high schools.

Series 3: Junior High Schools, 1991-1992, contains report cards for 21 junior high and middle schools.

Series 4: Special Programs, 1991-1992, contains report cards for 8 special programs.

Materials are in good condition and dated 1991-1992.

Dates

  • 1991 - 1992

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is open to the public without restriction. The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material.

Conditions Governing Use

Permission to duplicate or publish material from this collection must be obtained from the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Biographical / Historical

The Charlotte Mecklenburg School system (CMS) was founded in 1882 as a segregated public education system.

Leadership:

TJ Mitchell was the first superintendent of the segregated school district. The school system had many superintendents in the century following its opening. Professor JT Corlew served as the second superintendent from 1886-1888, followed by Dr. Alexander Graham, who took over as superintendent from 1888-1913. During Alexander’s time the school system became known as “the largest public school system south of Baltimore.” Alexander drastically changed the way the system was operated by developing a co-ed school and dropping Latin and Greek from the curriculum to make room for drawing and music. Under Alexander, a second school for White students opened in 1900, which was named “North School”. Dr. Harry Harding became superintendent in 1913, and during his time two schools were built: Alexander Graham High School and Central High School. J.W. Wilson served as superintendent from 1944-1960 and was responsible for consolidating many schools in the CMS system.

Other men and women who served in the superintendent role include: Dr. Elmer Garinger, Dr. A. Craig Phillips (1961-1967), Dr. William Self (1967-1972), Dr. Roland Jones (1973-1976), Dr. Jay Robinson (1977-1986), Dr. Peter Relic (1987-1991), Dr. John Murphy (1991-1996), Dr. Eric Smith (1996-2002), Dr. James L. Pughsley* (2002-2005) (*First African-American Superintendent), Dr. Frances Haithcock (interim 2005-2006), Dr. Peter Gorman (2006-2011), Dr. Heath E. Morrison (2012-2014), Ann Clark (interim 2014-2016), Dr. Clayton Wilcox (2016-2019), and Earnest Winston (2019-present).

The Black community had many notable leaders in education, to include Dr. James L. Pughsley, who served as the first African-American CMS superintendent from 2002-2005. He focused his energy on “academic success and rigor for all students.” His efforts led to the district being recognized by the Council of Great City Schools as “one of four urban school districts making outstanding gains in student achievement while narrowing the achievement gap.”

William U. Harris and B.D. Roberts are two other notable educators and advocators for the importance of quality schools and education for Black children.

Segregation:

The first school for white children was South School, located on the corner of East Morehead Street and South Boulevard. Myers Street School is remembered as the first school for Black students, which opened in 1882. It stood until the mid-twentieth century, when it was torn down as part of an urban renewal project. As of 2021, the site is part of the Metro School and Aquatic Center.

School consolidations began under Superintendent J.W. Wilson, (1944-1960), eventually merging the Charlotte City Schools with the Mecklenburg County Schools in 1960. Charlotte schools continued to be largely segregated, even after the 1954 Supreme Court decision on Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. There were no moves made toward integration for three years after the Brown decision.

On September 9, 1970, the Charlotte Mecklenburg School system was integrated. The first four African-American students to enter white schools were Delores Huntley (Alexander Graham Junior High), Girvaud Roberts (Piedmont Junior High School, Gus Roberts (Central High School), and Dorothy Counts (Harding High School). Gus Roberts graduated from Central in 1959. By 1964, Charlotte had 88 segregated schools (57 white, 31 black).

The slow integration of schools ultimately led to Swann vs. the Charlotte Mecklenburg Board of Education in 1965. Reverend Darius Swann and his wife, Vera, had served overseas in India as missionaries, where their son attended integrated schools. The Swanns understood and valued the opportunity for all students to learn from each other in an integrated setting. The Swanns argued that “children were able to transfer out of integrated schools, but not allowed to transfer into them, and that the law should be equally binding… otherwise the law is discriminatory.” By July 1965, Judge Braxton Craven ruled in favor of the Board of Education, justifying their steady progress of bringing an end to the segregated school system. Years later in 1969, the Swann case was refiled. Federal judge James B McMillan ruled that the school district was not desegregated and ordered Board of Education to submit a detailed plan for fully integrating schools.

In 1960, the Charlotte City and Mecklenburg County school systems were consolidated to become what is known today as the Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools. As of 2017, there are 170 schools in the Charlotte Mecklenburg School District, serving over 147,000 students. It is also one of the largest employers in Mecklenburg County, with over 19,000 employees.

Extent

0.82 Linear Feet

0.70 Cubic Feet

Language of Materials

English

Arrangement

The report cards are arranged into four series:

Series 1: Elementary Schools, 1991-1992, contains report cards for 73 elementary schools.

Series 2, High Schools, 1991-1992, contains report cards for 10 high schools.

Series 3: Junior High Schools, 1991-1992, contains report cards for 21 junior high and middle schools.

Series 4: Special Programs, 1991-1992, contains report cards for 8 special programs.

Materials are in good condition and dated 1991-1992.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

The immediate source and date of acquisition for this collection is unknown.

Related Materials

Central High School Breakfast Club Records. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Central High School Collection, 1930, 1937, 1952. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Central High School Collection, 1947. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Directory Collection, 1934-1990. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. "Charlotte-Mecklenburg School Report." [Charlotte, N.C.] : Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. "Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Report Card, 1993-1994." [Charlotte, N.C.] : Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, 1994.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. "Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Report Card, 1994-1995." [Charlotte, N.C.] : Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, 1995.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. "Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Profiles, 1995-1996." [Charlotte, N.C.] : Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, 1996.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. "2000-2001 District Profile." [Charlotte, N.C.] : The Schools, 2001.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. "2002-2003 District Profile." [Charlotte, N.C.] : The Schools, 2003.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. "Personnel Directory." Charlotte, NC : Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, [1981?]-.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. "School Profiles, 1996-1997." [Charlotte, N.C.] : The Schools, 1997.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. "Teachers' Handbook." [Charlotte, N.C. : The Schools].

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Yearbook Collection.

Charlotte School Ledgers Collection, 1861-1918. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

First Ward Elementary School Records, 1980-2013. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Harding High School Collection, 1920-2006. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

James Kidd Central High School Collection, 1928. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Midwood Elementary School Scrapbook, 1940-1960. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

North Mecklenburg High School Collection, 1960-1961. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Piedmont Junior High School Collection. Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Bibliography

Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools. “History of CMS.” Accessed April 2019. http://www.cms.k12.nc.us/mediaroom/aboutus/Pages/History.aspx

Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library. Schools. CMStory. Accessed April 2019. https://www.cmstory.org/advanced-search?keys=+schools

Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library. 1970-Charlotte Mecklenburg School System is Integrated. CMStory. Accessed April 2019. https://www.cmstory.org/exhibits/african-american-album-volume-2/1970-charlotte-mecklenburg-school-system-integrated

The Broad Prize for Urban Education. Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools. Accessed April 2019. http://www.cms.k12.nc.us/mediaroom/Documents/The%20Broad%20Prize--Charlotte%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf

Condition Description

Materials are in good condition.

Processing Information

The processing, arrangement, and description of this collection was completed by Sydney Carroll, July 2021.
Title
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Report Cards, 1991-1992
Status
Completed
Author
Sydney Carroll
Date
2021-07-07
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Repository Details

Part of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library Repository

Contact:
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library-Main
310 N. Tryon Street
Charlotte NC 28202 USA